Read dragon s dialogue by Anthony Jerome Brown Online

dragon-s-dialogue

In Dragon's Dialogue, a Fantasy novella (for ages twelve through adult), a most unlikely heroine, Elatria Golden, a young girl and vegetarian in New York City, seems destined to meet Zardor, a benign philosophical dragon--or is he really a product of her father's imagination? Elatria encounters animals with unusual capabilities, a boa constrictor and a bird, and becomes acIn Dragon's Dialogue, a Fantasy novella (for ages twelve through adult), a most unlikely heroine, Elatria Golden, a young girl and vegetarian in New York City, seems destined to meet Zardor, a benign philosophical dragon--or is he really a product of her father's imagination? Elatria encounters animals with unusual capabilities, a boa constrictor and a bird, and becomes acquainted with a handsome mutant--or is he really an elf? And Elatria is bound to another world, Ibinissia, where she confronts a powerful malevolent force rooted in the intersection of two planes of existence, and shockingly discovers what it means to become more than human....

Title : dragon s dialogue
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 18216473
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 80 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

dragon s dialogue Reviews

  • JoselynMoreno Burke
    2020-01-24 01:12

    I received this book in exchange for an honest review (LoP or Lovers of Paranormal)It was a little bizarre at times, but it proved to be a cute and interesting lite reading, with lots of magic and optimism that we all need so much.I liked it, it was nice and very imaginative and i had so much fun reading it =)

  • Dana Smythe
    2020-02-07 00:56

    Dragon’s Dialogue, by Anthony Jerome Brown, follows a trail of events that starts with a young girl deciding to write a letter to a dragon, and ending with – well, I shouldn’t tell you that, in case you want to read the story for yourself. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review (LoP).The description provided of this book made me think that it was going to be an exploration of a child’s mind, and a story of potential madness blended with fantasy. This is far from what it proved to be however. Indeed, while the “main” character of Elatria Golden is a charming little girl who is destined to inadvertently end a war, her plotline was handled almost like an afterthought. Her character was the glue that held the other plotlines together, but one is left with the impression that the author wasn’t much interested in her otherwise.Apart from the distinction of receiving more attention in the form of face time, the other characters did not fare much better. There was an almost complete lack of character development, and motivations were usually muddled or absent. The perspective also had a habit of fluctuating between third person limited and third person omniscient, which unfortunately served to highlight the lack of depth given to most of the characters. Adding to the sense of unevenness were some unusual – almost to the point of confusing – choices in tempo and pacing, as well as some tonal discrepancies. When switching between Elatria’s sections and just about anyone else’s, it almost felt like switching to an entirely different book. Despite these and some other serious drawbacks, like the characters’ habits of pontification and a leaning towards being preachy that at times made this feel like an after-school special, I can’t say that I disliked this book. The ending felt rushed and anti-climactic, and information had a tendency of being dumped on the reader in lengthy, uninterrupted segments, but again, despite all of this, there’s something here.At heart, a book is its concept, and this book’s concept is intriguing – many of its concepts, I should say. The innocent young girl whose purity shines like a beacon in the darkness of two worlds and both sides of a war is of course the central one, but the idea of the werelions and the Lionkin were also compelling in a primal but subtle manner. This book came close to feeling unique in this way, and in its combination of fantasy themes. And it was close to being a lot of other things as well – it was close to endearing, close to hopeful, and overall it really was very close to being quite good. At the end of the last chapter, it left me feeling wistful, thinking that I had just read something that could have been, or might one day be, a new classic in its genre. It’s just not quite there yet.

  • Christina Morales
    2020-02-04 21:58

    I love me a good dragon book. This did the job, but differently. The story starts rather quickly, girls toy dragon breaks, letter written to suppose dragon, parents freaking out. The story felt cut together. There was no flow that I could find. Like other reviewers, this can be read for all ages. Can't wait to read more from this author. I received this book in exchange for an honest review (LoP or Lovers of Paranormal)

  • Sheila
    2020-02-02 23:04

    Dragon's Dialogue is an unusual fairie tale--with that classic quality--for adults, too. You think it's just going on in this world, and you're realistically taken into another wild world, where exciting adventures occur and interesting characters are encountered. Highly recommended!

  • Anthony Brown
    2020-02-18 17:57